Homebirth in South Dakota

South Dakota isn’t particularly close to me here in Western MT.  However, SD is a neighboring state, and I have relatives who live in that state, so birth news from SD is important to me!

SD is working on legislation that will allow women to birth at home with assistance of certified nurse midwives (CNM). 

Current laws require South Dakota’s Certified Nurse Midwives to have a signed collaborative agreement with a physician as a pre-requisite to practice.  However, South Dakota’s physicians have failed to cooperate with any Certified Nurse Midwife for homebirth.
 
The South Dakota Chapter of the American College of Nurse Midwives supports the measure and provided testimony on Wednesday citing the safety of low risk mothers who have planned home births with Certified Nurse Midwives.

I don’t believe that Montana allows CNMs to attend homebirths.  I do know that doctors who used to provide back-up support for direct entry midwives (different certification and oversight than CNMs) in my community no longer do.  I like the language in the article – “. . . physicians have failed to cooperate . . .” – indeed!

Jeanne Prentice is a CNM from South Dakota that currently attends homebirths in Wyoming. 

Prentice is alarmed at the growing number of mothers who are choosing to deliver without any help at home because they fear what may be forced on them in the hospital delivery setting.

Indeed, many of us know well enough that hospital delivery can be interventive.  Women are not in a position of power with regard to their bodies, their babies, and their birth plans.  I am not talking about balking at medically-necessary intervention.  However, very little of what goes on in labor and deliver is NECESSARY.  Women are subject to a number of routine procedures and protocols upon entrance to to the hospital.  Women are resisting, and I believe this has caused 2 things:

  1. Care providers, especially medical providers, insurance companies, and other medical institutions are becoming more restrictive, more interventive, and less woman-centered.  This is evidenced by declining maternal-infant outcomes, increased cesarean deliveries, increased PTSD & PPD, and declining VBAC rates.
  2. Out-of-hospital birth is on the rise.  Women and finally starting to realize (I know I am) that their chances of having a good and safe childbirth experience are declining in hospitals.  Women are learning and owning the benefits of natural physiologic childbirth, when possible, and insisting on finding care providers who will enable that.
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2 responses to “Homebirth in South Dakota

  1. Natural childbirth seems to be a thing of the past. Most mothers are not aware of the pressure that will be on them when they arrive in the hospital. Natural Childbirth can be achieved in both settings (hosp and home) if mothers start HIRING the right care providers. They also need to look at natural childbirth techniques to help them achieve their goal. I believe all women have within them the ability to have a natural childbirth without the agony and pain associated with it and can achieve this in any setting.
    Kaisa Winckler
    Certifed HypnoBirthing Practitioner
    HypnoBirthing Mother (twice)

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