The Cost of Miscarriage

It’s been a while since I posted last.  I guess it’s that time in the semester where I’m so busy teaching, advising, and attending events that I have no time for anything else!  Plus, I had a major job during a “Super Regional” conference that took place in my town last weekend.

I have received a couple of bills from my 2/23/08 miscarriage:

LEVEL 4 HOSPITAL SERVICE

  • Recovery phase 1 lvl 2 per hr $419.25
  • Path group 3 122.00
  • Venipuncture x 2 26
  • ABO group 38.50 (they had access to this info)
  • RH type 31.25 (I told them I was RH+)
  • Antibody screen 83.50 (???)
  • CBC 48.25 (narrowly avoided a transfusion!)
  • surgery major 1 1207.00
  • set up for surgery 641.50
  • anesthetic 42.50
  • propofol 80.11 (damn, that had better have been good stuff!)
  • lidocaine 7.50
  • sevoflurane 231.20 (now, THAT better be good stuff)
  • metoclophramidercar (say that 3 times fast) 16.38
  • dexamethasone 16.38
  • fentanyl 16.38
  • hydromorphone 16.38
  • ondansertron x 2 32.76
  • fentanyl 16.38 (again?)
  • recovery/observation 75.00
    GRAND TOTAL: $3168.22

That’s what a curettage (following/during miscarriage) costs you (or more).  When it’s all said and done I’ll owe $650.29, plus I received a $97.00 bill for the follow-up with the OB.  It should have been a $15.00 copay, but since they coded it maternity, my insurance company isn’t paying for it, claiming that it’s covered under my global (maternity) copay.  THANKS FOR THAT NICE SWIFT KICK TO MY BROKEN UTERUS.

Still, nearly every moment of every day I remember what I have lost this past year.  And there’s no hope yet of moving past it.  There’s always tomorrow . . .

Sharing Cesarean Awareness

I found this on ICAN’s eNews (www.ican-online.org/community/eNews/) and want to share it with those who maybe aren’t (yet) subscribers!

Cesareans Affect Lives. Real women, real babies. Lives changed.

How has your cesarean impacted you? Come to www.ican-online.org and blog about your experiences in 100 words or less, tell us your story.

Cesarean Awareness:
is not only about the “bad” cesarean and recovery
is not about guilt for not succeeding at VBAC
is not about not attempting VBAC
is a state of being, whatever that may be for you or me – hope, fear, acceptance, sadness, depression, thankfulness
is about doing the research to understand the reality of the risks taken on every time another mother has another surgery

ICAN is about all birthing women having access to that information.  Cesarean Awareness Month is about encouraging the spread of that information.  We want to encourage you to find a way to spread the awareness in your community. Wear your ribbon. Write on your car. Buy brochures to drop off in the library. Put up a poster at your work. This is about open communication about the health of our women, babies and families.

April: Cesarean Awareness Month

Cesarean Awareness Month (CAM) is an internationally recognized awareness month which sheds light on the impact of cesarean surgery on mothers, babies, and families worldwide.  Cesarean birth is major abdominal surgery for women with serious health risks to weigh for both moms and babies.  Cesareans may be safer now than they ever have been, but this surgery is being conducted more frequently than is prudent or safe.  The acceptable rate established by the World Health Organization (WHO) is 10-15% – what is your community’s cesarean rate?

The blogosphere is atwitter about Cesarean Awareness Month.  Here are some posts I found today that deal directly with CAM:

  • Instinctual Birth’s post
  • No Womb Pod’s post
  • Strain Station’s post
  • Cesarean Awareness’s post
  • CT Birth Experience’s post
  • She Got Hips’s post
  • CT Doula’s post

If you have blogged about Cesarean Awareness Month and don’t appear on my list, please leave a comment so we can read your post.

To learn more about cesarean awareness, support, and education, visit the Internation Cesarean Awareness Network (ICAN) website and/or look for a chapter in your area.  Another great resource to consult when weighing the benefits and risks of intervention in chilbirth is Childbirth Connection.  Also, I recommend looking at and considering the Mother-Friendly Childbirth Initiative.

How do you plan to honor Cesarean Awareness Month?  How can you let people know that natural birth is an important issue for you and for them?  I promise that there is some way, no matter how small it may seem, that you can have a positive impact on your birth community.  Even wearing a cesarean awareness ribbon several days this month will help.  If you need ideas, feel free to ask.

Recurrent Miscarriage Update

I had a follow-up appointment yesterday with the OB who performed the needed curretage a few weeks ago.  I can’t say that I really learned anything helpful from the meeting. 

Pathology on the baby came back normal though apparently no chromosomal analysis was done.  I hadn’t realized that the pathology would only rule out ectopic or molar pregnancies.  I already knew from the ultrasound that neither of those were concerns.  So that was a costly dead end.

Chromosomal abnormalities?  Perhaps, so she recommends testing for both me and my husband.  I assume that we will go ahead and do that.

Progesterone deficiency?  Perhaps, so she recommends taking Clomid when I’m ready to conceive again.  I was not previously aware of using Clomid to treat potential progesterone deficiency or apparent “luteal phase defect.”  Since I ovulate on our around the 15th cycle day, I don’t think LPD is my issue.   However, I’m not ruling out some sort of hormone imbalance.  When I’ve had HCG levels tested, those numbers have been just fine.  But I’ve never had my progesterone level checked, and this OB wouldn’t do it anyway even after Clomid treatment.  I find that odd.  What if the Clomid wasn’t quite enough to sustain the corpus luteum until the placenta takes over?  Wouldn’t it make sense that I could still possibly need progesterone supplementation even after conceiving on Clomid.  (Remember that I have no conception problems; I’m just “failing” to sustain pregnancy right now.)

Immunological problems?  Not suspected though I am inclined to disagree.  I have a history of endometriosis, depression, low energy, and adult onset acne, for instance.  My mother has rheumatoid arthritis which is an auto-immune disease.  I rarely feel particularly “great,” but then again, given what I’ve been through this past year it would be hard to identify a great day even if it was right under my nose.  I found the Reproductive Immunology Associates’ information on miscarriage prevention to be interesting, encouraging, disheartening, and overwhelming.  I will pursue some of these ideas with local care providers.

Next month I will follow-up with another OB in town.  I may also go see an endocrinologist who has been recommended.  There are evidently fertility specialists as near as Spokane, so perhaps I should be contacting them?  I have so many questions, and I don’t know if I’ll ever find answers.  That’s perhaps the scariest part.  At this moment I think I could deal with being told that trying to conceive again would not likely be successful for X, Y, or Z reasons.  We do have one incredible child, and I might be inclined to consider adopting from abroad.  But to have to deal with the unknown is what really worries me.  Three miscarriages in a row “just” bad luck?  How will I overcome that “diagnosis” if it is the most likely deduction?

Time will tell.  Each day is different.  Some days are ok and some are not.  I am living moment to moment, hour to hour, day to day.  Planning ahead for anything is excrutiating.  But “ahead” will come whether I like it or not, whether I can deal with it right now or not, and whether I can deal with it then or not.

International Women’s Day: Investing in Women and Girls

Last Friday one of my students presented me with a potted mini rose bush.  I assumed it was a gesture related to my recent miscarriage, but actually it was a gift in celebration of International Women’s Day (3/8/08).  International Women’s Day?  I had never heard of such a thing, but in my student’s home country, it is customary to present women with flowers on IWD.  I was glad she chose a potted flower!

My last post listed the top 10 countries for being a woman according to the UN Development Programme.  The US (12) did not make the list, but neither did the UK (16), Mexico (52), my student’s Ukraine (76), or Germany (22). [1]  In the course of looking up the data I found Kemal Dervis’s statement for International Women’s Day.  The theme is “Investing in Women and Girls.”  Dervis states that this theme “is about changing the systems and attitudes that discriminate against women and prevent them from fully participating in and benefiting from the economies and societies in which they live.”  How do we plan to honor this goal in the US?  How can we tackle important women’s issues in our communities?  How will we positively influence local, statewide, and national political trends to discuss and improve the lives of women and girls in the US?

Are you “unseen” in your community or recognize women at risk in your community?  Do something proactive!  Whether it’s starting a support group, mentoring teen moms, taking a meal to a family or friend in need, picketing City Hall, raising legislative awareness, or even simply smiling at a woman or girl who looks like she needs it, you can make a difference. 

[1] UN Development Programme, Human Development Report 2007/2008, GDI Rank

Contrast these homebirth news stories!

I have followed homebirth legislation news in Utah and South Dakota with interest and concern.  I don’t want Montana getting any stupid ideas. 

UtahI blogged about their nonsense recently.  Yesterday, the Utah Senate voted to restrict homebirth practices.  The bill was supposed to have been a compromise, but what resulted was something restrictive and punitive.  Women will be forced to attempt VBACs in hospitals or on their own.  Were this the case in my state, I would have an overwhelminly large chance at “failure” since my hospital’s VBAC rate is a pitiful <1%.  They only had 16 successful VBACs at the hospital in 2006.  Utah legislators have chosen a path that makes homebirth less safe.  To search for Senate Bill 93, click here.

South DakotaI also blogged about their homebirth “situation,” and it appears that both the SD House and Senate have approved a homebirth bill. 

The bill would require midwives to become registered nurses, get master’s degrees in nursing, and pass additional tests. Certified nurse midwives wanting to attend home births would need approval of both the Nursing board and the Board of Medical Examiners.

Allowing certified nurse midwives to attend home births in South Dakota would be allowed on a trial basis until 2013.  (click here for source article)

My concern is that CNMs were previously required to have OB back-up, and evidently no OBs were agreeing to provide back-up services.  What will be different?  And I’m not sure that having a Masters Degree makes anyone particularly qualified to attend labor.  Shouldn’t these homebirth midwives have assisted on “x” number of births before they become licensed?  Why is it always about the piece of paper??

Also, the bill states that CNMs will be able to attend homebirths “under certain circumstances” but doesn’t clarify what those circumstances may be.  I suppose we must find the Board guidelines to find more clear language.  To read the bill, click here.