It was a big day

Phew, 7pm and I’m exhausted.  Here’s a summary of my activities today:

The twins – yes, I said twins, look good.  I’m not quite as far along (only by a couple of days) as I would have thought, and this is an agonizing alteration to my pregnancy “schedule.”  What I mean is that as a loss momma, that last thing I want to be doing is backing up in time… adding MORE time into the 1st trimester.

Both babies are measuring about the same size.  Both babies’ heartbeats were easily detected and measured right around 130 which is good for 6 weeks 4 days or so.  We were so thankful to see those sweet flickers again.

My husband and I found out definitively about the twins about a week ago.  A nurse at the RE’s office recommended a scan because my HCG numbers doubled too quickly.  At about 5-1/2 or 6 weeks we were able to see two sacs and even visualize the heartbeats for both babies.  I call them my little flickers.

Health Reform:  I was thrilled to have been invited to attend a local health reform meeting to represent consumer concerns.  I introduced myself as an University professor and a professional opera singer which of course got a couple of laughs.  Then, I continued by saying that I’m a consumer advocate and come to this gathering as a woman with a scarred uterus.  The main concerns I articulated as a cesarean mom were:

  1. A high local cesarean rate (around 31%); a low VBAC rate (about 1%) at the hospital
  2. A lack of support for the local birth center
  3. Decrease in numbers of CNMs locally
  4. Insurance and health care costs
  5. Insurance company driven health “care”

Additionally, it alarms me that even with my supposed “good” health coverage, I am struggling to pay last year’s medical bills.  The bills are overwhelming, so they pile up, and my credit score is suffering as well.

Arts Advocacy:  I am one of the educations outreach directors for a new opera company.  We had a meeting today to help prepare for the next board meeting and our upcoming educational outreach program.

I even managed to mop the floors.  I’d say it was a pretty darned productive day.

Bad news for homebirth in Utah

From an article in the Salt Lake Tribune:

    The bill would put new limits on direct-entry midwives, who are licensed and attend home births. By defining a “normal” birth, it bans them from administering to women with a host of medical conditions, from diabetes to hypertension.
    They also would be stopped from assisting women whose babies are breech or who want a vaginal birth after a previous cesarean section (VBAC).

How is it that people who never see “normal” birth (a term that is easily usurped and unfortunately true of augmented birth in this day and age) are able to determine normalcy.  If they can determine “normal”, then perhaps they should start overtly forcing more women into induction, augmentation, and other interventions.  Medically-managed labor & delivery is certainly most common in a hospital setting.  In fact, why don’t we just get rid of the mother’s (and other vested persons’) desires altogether?  Many – if not most – OBs are contemptuous towards mothers with birth plans anyway.

I can tell you that “normal” should equate to “natural”, but it doesn’t any more.  And really the only venue for assuring natural birth is home.  Sure “natural” might not happen for everyone.  I’m not even trying to suggest that all women should give birth at home.  But these restrictions . . . why not ensure that direct-entry midwives are well-trained for breech, twin, and VBAC scenarios.  How do you ensure this?  By keeping it legal and supporting midwives who feel confident in their skill level with breech, twin, and VBAC labor.  Just as an OB should know if s/he is the appropriate person to deliver a breech baby or perform an amniocentesis (and lemme tell you, some simply are NOT), so should a CNM or direct-entry midwife.

I’ve written about “normal” and “natural” before – click here to read!