Cesarean Scar Care Webinar

I just attended the Cesarean Scar Care Webinar with Isa Herrera via the International Cesarean Awareness Network (ICAN).  What a terrific benefit for subscribers (it was free), a great introduction to ICAN for folks who aren’t subs, and a great cost ($15) for non subscribers.

Herrera is the author of Ending Female Pain and performs physical therapy in New York City.  I was excited to attend this webinar because 5 months post cesarean, I still have a LOT of pain and tenderness, especially on the left side.  I imagine this has a lot to do with E’s position in utero.  Herrera said that an uncomfortable lie can cause more adhesions, so obviously I have a lot of work to do to break up those adhesions and get to healing!

Herrera states:

“Women coming to me are often not getting the tools and advice they need . . .” to recover from cesareans.

Sad but not surprising.

Something I previously misunderstood:  according to Herrera the abdominal muscles (the recti) are not cut during surgery.  Instead, they are pushed to the side.

Something else I didn’t know:  during a cesarean 8 layers of fascia and connective tissue are cut.  From what I previously learned, it’s the damage to the fascia and connective tissues that compromise the uterus the most.

Something of which I am skeptical:  Herrera hypothesizes that regularizing and rehabilitating the scar tissue and adhesions may reduce the risk of uterine rupture in future pregnancies and labors.  The reason that I am skeptical is that from what I know about scar formation and healing, scar tissue NEVER approximates undamaged tissue.  Scar tissue organizes differently from undamaged tissue.  On the other hand, it is possible that with Body Talk or acupuncture or other healing modalities that damaged tissue can be restored.  And it’s not like my arm splits open every time I use it, and I have a large gnarly scar on it!

Herrera talked us through a number of exercises and stretches that should help break up adhesions and encourage healing.  The ones that I plan to start using immediately are “long strokes,” “longitudinal stretches,” and kegels while drawing in my abs.  I’ve also started using my Wii Fit and have found that the exercises there have woken up my core a bit.  I am also massaging lavender oil, purchased from Young Living because of the medicinal-grade quality, into the “damaged” areas.

For more information on cesarean scar care, purchase Herrera’s book.  Also, check out the websites http://www.apta.org and http://www.pelvicrehab.com.

April is Cesarean Awareness Month

For those of you who do not know, April is Cesarean Awareness Month. Did you know that our national cesarean rate continues to increase every year? Over 31% of births take place surgically via cesarean section. Consumer Reports has named cesarean surgery one of the top overused procedures in the United States. Even though the US tends to deal with pregnancy and childbirth from a medical perspective, our country’s maternal/fetal outcomes are among the WORST in the industrialized world. I hope you will take some time this month to learn about cesarean surgery, why women in your communities may not consider cesarean-born babies to have been birthed, why women are having more trouble post-cesarean with becoming or staying pregnant, why women may have less access to birthing options following a cesarean, and why women should be searching for less medically-interventive options for pregnancy and childbirth. Talk to people in your community about preventing unnecessary cesareans (keeping in mind that cesareans are appropriate for some emergent situations and in case of emergency), midwifery care (nurse-midwifery and professional midwifery), birth venue choices, and how to help someone recover from a cesarean. For more information on Cesarean Awareness Month, visit http://www.ican-online.org and also search for a local chapter. Together we can make a difference, one birth at a time.

What drew me to childbirth advocacy

I received an excellent question from a Facebook friend the other day.  And even though my response is brief, I suppose this might be a question that a lot of folks have for people like me!

“So I’m curious… What led you to become involved with ICAN? Personal experience or passionate commitment to natural childbirth? Or both?”   “I am always interested in how people come to be involved in this kind of advocacy.”

My brief response:

I had a cesarean in 2004 and didn’t fully understand the impact of it until much later. I joined ICAN when it was time to try for another baby and have been involved ever since. So, now it’s personal experience as well as passionate commitment to evidence-based practices in obstetrics as well as spreading the word about the benefits of natural childbirth, VBAC, homebirth, birth plans, doulas, midwives, whatever! Also, I’m very concerned about the national cesarean rate and our local rate in Missoula. That’s it in a nutshell!!

And of course I suggested that she have a look at my blog!

It was a big day

Phew, 7pm and I’m exhausted.  Here’s a summary of my activities today:

The twins – yes, I said twins, look good.  I’m not quite as far along (only by a couple of days) as I would have thought, and this is an agonizing alteration to my pregnancy “schedule.”  What I mean is that as a loss momma, that last thing I want to be doing is backing up in time… adding MORE time into the 1st trimester.

Both babies are measuring about the same size.  Both babies’ heartbeats were easily detected and measured right around 130 which is good for 6 weeks 4 days or so.  We were so thankful to see those sweet flickers again.

My husband and I found out definitively about the twins about a week ago.  A nurse at the RE’s office recommended a scan because my HCG numbers doubled too quickly.  At about 5-1/2 or 6 weeks we were able to see two sacs and even visualize the heartbeats for both babies.  I call them my little flickers.

Health Reform:  I was thrilled to have been invited to attend a local health reform meeting to represent consumer concerns.  I introduced myself as an University professor and a professional opera singer which of course got a couple of laughs.  Then, I continued by saying that I’m a consumer advocate and come to this gathering as a woman with a scarred uterus.  The main concerns I articulated as a cesarean mom were:

  1. A high local cesarean rate (around 31%); a low VBAC rate (about 1%) at the hospital
  2. A lack of support for the local birth center
  3. Decrease in numbers of CNMs locally
  4. Insurance and health care costs
  5. Insurance company driven health “care”

Additionally, it alarms me that even with my supposed “good” health coverage, I am struggling to pay last year’s medical bills.  The bills are overwhelming, so they pile up, and my credit score is suffering as well.

Arts Advocacy:  I am one of the educations outreach directors for a new opera company.  We had a meeting today to help prepare for the next board meeting and our upcoming educational outreach program.

I even managed to mop the floors.  I’d say it was a pretty darned productive day.

A Hole in My Venus

I’ve been looking through stock and Creative Commons Licensed photos tonight that deal with pregnancy.  I figured that while I’m in the mood I’d look for some photos that we could possibly use for the upcoming ICAN Conference in April in Atlanta.

I find this a particularly interesting portrayal of Venus, the goddess of fertility among others.  Notice that in this piece of artwork, she is missing her lower abdomen.  There is a hole there.  This is how I feel – like a goddess (albeit worldly, a woman who is quite fertile) whose corrupted uterus has been excised from her body.  It is so hard not to point at the cesarean as the root of my current woes.

I am so sorry that so many of you know how I feel.  No one deserves it.

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