What Can I Say?

I am so out of the loop when it comes to anything having to do with reproduction these days.  I’m not in the loop . . . I’m not in the outskirts or the suburbs.  I’m off the grid.  However, a new comment on my ever “popular” miscarriage and hormones post made me feel compelled to post an update.

Random thoughts about life, birth, and the like . . .

  • My 1/2 acre yard and gardens are in disastrous condition, but I did plant some annuals today; that made me happy!
  • My husband is getting ready to add a second floor to our house – his company is called Aria Construction, and they do fantastic high-end work
  • My youngest is now almost 11 months – I still want to smash her into 0-3 mo. clothes…
  • The twins will be 3 in August, and they are such a joy and such a torment.  I still can’t believe they are mine!!
  • My oldest, age 7, had a stupidly horrible time in 1st grade.  Here’s hoping for rest and recovery this summer and a better experience in 2nd grade.
  • No, I’ve still not written my birth story from July 12, 2011 . . . what’s the hang-up?  Well, I still have issues with G’s birth and with a local care provider.  That’s part of it, I’m sure.

Am I recovered from my birth losses?

Yes and no . . . those losses, in a way, made these last three children possible.  However, I still feel an emptiness that will never go away.

Am I recovered from my birthing losses?

Mostly no.  Physical activity causes the adhesions to hurt.  The unevenness in my lower abdomen (fat layer – scar – fat layer) is something I see and feel every day.  Although my VBA2C was a “success,” I feel quite bitter about the last weeks (from 31 weeks to nearly 42 weeks) of my pregnancy.  From 39 weeks onward, every day was a struggle, emotionally.  The birth was stressful.  I didn’t feel a darned thing and had to be told when and how to push.  I didn’t birth my child, but at least I didn’t have to endure her being cut out of my body.

Birth advocacy . . .

I still feel quite out of sorts about childbirth in Missoula and elsewhere.  Any time I see that someone had a cesarean – primary or repeat – I want to know why.  I wish Missoulians seemed to care more about how they birth their babies.  I feel like people either go the homebirth route and mostly enjoy a rewarding birth experience or people sign up for the slaughter.  I know there are good docs and good nurses out there, but I definitely lack trust.  And people don’t know their rights or don’t care that they have rights or don’t know how to exercise their rights when it comes to their own health care.  Everyone else seems to just mind their own business.  <shrug>  I’m planning a few VBAC Resources and Support sessions this year – wish me luck!

Well, that’s where I am today.  I see that Rixa is blogging about important stuff, of course.  See her latest regarding the Human Rights in Childbirth panel.

Cesarean Recovery, v.1

I am annoyed by my cesarean recovery.  I am more than 5 months post partum and still have pain and tenderness on the left side of my abdomen.  I’m sure I must have a number of adhesions that need to be broken down.  I did attend ICAN’s webinar about scar care and have been doing some massage.  I use a few drops of Young Living’s lavender oil – I recommend a therapeutic/medicinal grade essential oil – and massage it into my skin.  I have to massage all along the left side of the top layer of abdominal muscles (rectus abdominus), and it’s tender from pelvis to ribs.  Not good.

I am also annoyed that so many people are resigned to putting themselves, their babies, and their patients through this major abdominal surgery without a really really good reason.  Fetal distress, small pelvis, cephalo-pelvic disproportion, maternal demand, and previous cesarean are the usual suspects and are not necessarily indication for a cesarean.  <sigh>  I recovered easily enough from my first cesarean, but this time around it’s a different story.

I’ll end v.1 here.  To recap, I am not pleased with my recovery because I still have significant tenderness and pain more than 5 months after my surgery.  Does that sound like fun to you?

Cesarean Scar Care Webinar

I just attended the Cesarean Scar Care Webinar with Isa Herrera via the International Cesarean Awareness Network (ICAN).  What a terrific benefit for subscribers (it was free), a great introduction to ICAN for folks who aren’t subs, and a great cost ($15) for non subscribers.

Herrera is the author of Ending Female Pain and performs physical therapy in New York City.  I was excited to attend this webinar because 5 months post cesarean, I still have a LOT of pain and tenderness, especially on the left side.  I imagine this has a lot to do with E’s position in utero.  Herrera said that an uncomfortable lie can cause more adhesions, so obviously I have a lot of work to do to break up those adhesions and get to healing!

Herrera states:

“Women coming to me are often not getting the tools and advice they need . . .” to recover from cesareans.

Sad but not surprising.

Something I previously misunderstood:  according to Herrera the abdominal muscles (the recti) are not cut during surgery.  Instead, they are pushed to the side.

Something else I didn’t know:  during a cesarean 8 layers of fascia and connective tissue are cut.  From what I previously learned, it’s the damage to the fascia and connective tissues that compromise the uterus the most.

Something of which I am skeptical:  Herrera hypothesizes that regularizing and rehabilitating the scar tissue and adhesions may reduce the risk of uterine rupture in future pregnancies and labors.  The reason that I am skeptical is that from what I know about scar formation and healing, scar tissue NEVER approximates undamaged tissue.  Scar tissue organizes differently from undamaged tissue.  On the other hand, it is possible that with Body Talk or acupuncture or other healing modalities that damaged tissue can be restored.  And it’s not like my arm splits open every time I use it, and I have a large gnarly scar on it!

Herrera talked us through a number of exercises and stretches that should help break up adhesions and encourage healing.  The ones that I plan to start using immediately are “long strokes,” “longitudinal stretches,” and kegels while drawing in my abs.  I’ve also started using my Wii Fit and have found that the exercises there have woken up my core a bit.  I am also massaging lavender oil, purchased from Young Living because of the medicinal-grade quality, into the “damaged” areas.

For more information on cesarean scar care, purchase Herrera’s book.  Also, check out the websites http://www.apta.org and http://www.pelvicrehab.com.