Bad news for homebirth in Utah

From an article in the Salt Lake Tribune:

    The bill would put new limits on direct-entry midwives, who are licensed and attend home births. By defining a “normal” birth, it bans them from administering to women with a host of medical conditions, from diabetes to hypertension.
    They also would be stopped from assisting women whose babies are breech or who want a vaginal birth after a previous cesarean section (VBAC).

How is it that people who never see “normal” birth (a term that is easily usurped and unfortunately true of augmented birth in this day and age) are able to determine normalcy.  If they can determine “normal”, then perhaps they should start overtly forcing more women into induction, augmentation, and other interventions.  Medically-managed labor & delivery is certainly most common in a hospital setting.  In fact, why don’t we just get rid of the mother’s (and other vested persons’) desires altogether?  Many – if not most – OBs are contemptuous towards mothers with birth plans anyway.

I can tell you that “normal” should equate to “natural”, but it doesn’t any more.  And really the only venue for assuring natural birth is home.  Sure “natural” might not happen for everyone.  I’m not even trying to suggest that all women should give birth at home.  But these restrictions . . . why not ensure that direct-entry midwives are well-trained for breech, twin, and VBAC scenarios.  How do you ensure this?  By keeping it legal and supporting midwives who feel confident in their skill level with breech, twin, and VBAC labor.  Just as an OB should know if s/he is the appropriate person to deliver a breech baby or perform an amniocentesis (and lemme tell you, some simply are NOT), so should a CNM or direct-entry midwife.

I’ve written about “normal” and “natural” before – click here to read!