Caution: You may not need a myomectomy

I just talked with my regular OB.  He was under the impress that I had a Mullerian Anomaly (such as a septate uterus) and a major contributor to my recurrent pregnancy loss.  I’ve seen a Reproductive Endocrinologist recently who came up with his own recommendation.  He suggested that my 1-1/2 inch fibroid was distorting my uterine cavity and causing the recurrent pregnancy loss.  He said that he would be “very concerned” about that fibroid.

I double-checked my obstetric records from my 2004 pregnancy.  The fibroid was discovered during a 10-11 week ultrasound (a first-time mom, I was nervous that the midwife didn’t find my baby’s heartbeat).  The fibroid was roughly 4.5 cm then and is therefore about the same size now.  However, I don’t believe it to be a cause of my recurrent losses.  Rather, it is a symptom.  It is a symptom of imbalanced hormones, usually too much estrogen.

Anyway, my OB’s nurse called me today to say that he (my OB) would NOT recommend a myomectomy for a non-symptomatic small fibroid.  I don’t bleed without stopping; I don’t have unmanageable pain.  Since I already have a cesarean scar, he sees no reason to add to that.  Phew!

So, if anyone tells you that you definitely need a myomectomy, please do seek other opinions.  Your uterus may just say “thank you.”  In my case, it should be thankful that I’m saving it from at least two more uterine surgeries.

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My Medical Insurance Sucks

My medical benefits coverage sucks for my needs.  Now if I were a drug addict or wanted to have an abortion, that would be just dandy.  But alas, I “only” keep losing babies.  The insurance solution for that is – stop procreating cuz that’d be best for us.  We certainly don’t need to help you with your fertility issues just because you want to have more children.

I’m not infertile.  I’m just a habitual loser in the whole pregnancy maintenance arena.  Who can help me there?  My path has taken many turns, most leading to dead ends with providers who can’t acknowledge their limits.  Most recently, I was diagnosed via an uterine xray with a double uterus and told to “keep trying.”  I would need a referral to see an endocrinologist, even though I doubt that a general endocrinologist in this town would have a whole lot of experience in reproductive endocrinology.  In fact, the endo that my insurance service agent recommended seems to do more with diabetes.  But I’m expected to exhaust in state possibilities before I pursue specialists out of state.  I have yet to find an obstetrics group in town that believes that imbalanced hormones contribute to pregnancy loss.

I’ll be in Denver this summer, and even though there are reproductive endocrinologists (RE) there that are considered “in network,” I’m not allowed to see them?  I can waltz into any urgent care clinic in Denver with a common cold and get treatment, no questions asked, but I’m not allowed to see a RE?

My employer has no maternity policy and no infertility benefits.  Great place for a woman in the childbearing years, eh?